Contemporary Realism - ArtCyclopedia
Gerald Peters Gallery is pleased to present American Realism: A Survey. Gallery director Peter J. Marcelle and celebrated artist Daniel Sprick first allied themselves over their shared love of realist art. The two have joined forces to curate this special

Gerald Peters Gallery is pleased to present American Realism: A Survey. Gallery director Peter J. Marcelle and celebrated artist Daniel Sprick first allied themselves over their shared love of realist art. The two have joined forces to curate this special exhibition in celebration of the genre.

Featuring painting, drawing, and sculpture, American Realism: A Survey will explore the pluralistic nature of the realism movement. What constitutes realism? Over time the definition has blurred due to the vast diversity of styles within realist art. Realism has remained a constant in American painting, though appearing in various guises: traditional realism, photo realism, hyper realism, magic realism, painterly realism, neo-academic realism, and many more, all fall within its ever widening parameters.

The exhibition will highlight the works of notable contemporary luminaries such as Jamie Wyeth, Daniel Sprick, Harvey Dinnerstein, and Steven Assael, while paying homage to past exemplars such as John Koch and Andrew Wyeth. Through varying styles, each artist presents their interpretation of reality; all use a direct visual language to convey their individual truth.

Realism , in philosophy, the viewpoint which accords to things which are known or perceived an existence or nature which is independent of whether anyone is thinking about or perceiving them.

The affirmative answer may seem no more than the merest common sense, because the vast majority of one’s beliefs are certainly most naturally taken to concern mind-independent objects whose existence is an entirely objective matter. And this seems to be so whether the beliefs in question are about mundane matters such as one’s immediate surroundings or about theoretical scientific entities such as subatomic particles, fundamental forces, and so on. Nevertheless, much argument and clarification of the issues and concepts involved (e.g., objectivity and mind-independence) is required if the realism favoured by common sense is to be sustained as a philosophical position.

In application to matters of ontology, realism is standardly applied to doctrines which assert the existence of entities of some problematic or controversial kind. Even under this more restricted heading, however, realism and opposition to it have taken significantly different forms, as illustrated in the following three examples.

See J. D. Wild, Introduction to Realistic Philosophy (1948, repr. 1984); P. K. Feyerabend, Realism, Rationalism, and Scientific Method (Vol. 1, 1985); C. Wright, Realism, Meaning, and Truth (1987); R. L. Arrington, Rationalism, Realism, and Relativism (1989).

in literature and art, the truthful, objective reflection of reality by specific means characteristic of various types of artistic creativity. In the history of art, realism has been specifically associated with well-defined creative methods—for example, Enlightenment realism, critical realism, and socialist realism. Although these methods are interrelated by a degree of continuity, each of them possesses its own characteristic properties. Different manifestations of realistic tendencies are encountered in the various forms and genres of art.

Artistic truth consists of two indissolubly linked aspects: the objective reflection of the essential aspects of life and a truthful aesthetic evaluation—that is, the correlation of the social aesthetic ideal characteristic of a particular art form with the potential for progressive development concealed in reality. This may be termed the truth of an ideal or of an aesthetic evaluation. The most profound and artistically harmonious results are achieved by realistic art when both aspects of aesthetic truth are integrally combined, as they are in Rembrandt’s portraits, Pushkin’s poetry, and L. N. Tolstoy’s novels.

Gerald Peters Gallery is pleased to present American Realism: A Survey. Gallery director Peter J. Marcelle and celebrated artist Daniel Sprick first allied themselves over their shared love of realist art. The two have joined forces to curate this special exhibition in celebration of the genre.

Featuring painting, drawing, and sculpture, American Realism: A Survey will explore the pluralistic nature of the realism movement. What constitutes realism? Over time the definition has blurred due to the vast diversity of styles within realist art. Realism has remained a constant in American painting, though appearing in various guises: traditional realism, photo realism, hyper realism, magic realism, painterly realism, neo-academic realism, and many more, all fall within its ever widening parameters.

The exhibition will highlight the works of notable contemporary luminaries such as Jamie Wyeth, Daniel Sprick, Harvey Dinnerstein, and Steven Assael, while paying homage to past exemplars such as John Koch and Andrew Wyeth. Through varying styles, each artist presents their interpretation of reality; all use a direct visual language to convey their individual truth.

Realism , in philosophy, the viewpoint which accords to things which are known or perceived an existence or nature which is independent of whether anyone is thinking about or perceiving them.

The affirmative answer may seem no more than the merest common sense, because the vast majority of one’s beliefs are certainly most naturally taken to concern mind-independent objects whose existence is an entirely objective matter. And this seems to be so whether the beliefs in question are about mundane matters such as one’s immediate surroundings or about theoretical scientific entities such as subatomic particles, fundamental forces, and so on. Nevertheless, much argument and clarification of the issues and concepts involved (e.g., objectivity and mind-independence) is required if the realism favoured by common sense is to be sustained as a philosophical position.

In application to matters of ontology, realism is standardly applied to doctrines which assert the existence of entities of some problematic or controversial kind. Even under this more restricted heading, however, realism and opposition to it have taken significantly different forms, as illustrated in the following three examples.

Gerald Peters Gallery is pleased to present American Realism: A Survey. Gallery director Peter J. Marcelle and celebrated artist Daniel Sprick first allied themselves over their shared love of realist art. The two have joined forces to curate this special exhibition in celebration of the genre.

Featuring painting, drawing, and sculpture, American Realism: A Survey will explore the pluralistic nature of the realism movement. What constitutes realism? Over time the definition has blurred due to the vast diversity of styles within realist art. Realism has remained a constant in American painting, though appearing in various guises: traditional realism, photo realism, hyper realism, magic realism, painterly realism, neo-academic realism, and many more, all fall within its ever widening parameters.

The exhibition will highlight the works of notable contemporary luminaries such as Jamie Wyeth, Daniel Sprick, Harvey Dinnerstein, and Steven Assael, while paying homage to past exemplars such as John Koch and Andrew Wyeth. Through varying styles, each artist presents their interpretation of reality; all use a direct visual language to convey their individual truth.

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