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Source: University of Iowa Libraries, Special Collections & University Archives, FOLIO PS3201 1855, copy 1. The original e-text for this file was prepared by Primary Source Media for Major Authors on CD-ROM: Walt Whitman (1997). The

Source: University of Iowa Libraries, Special Collections & University Archives, FOLIO PS3201 1855, copy 1. The original e-text for this file was prepared by Primary Source Media for Major Authors on CD-ROM: Walt Whitman (1997). The source text for the Primary Source Media edition was Walt Whitman, Complete Poetry and Collected Prose , ed. Justin Kaplan (New York: Literary Classics of the United States, 1982). After receiving the e-text from Primary Source Media, Whitman Archive staff checked and corrected the transcription against images of the University of Iowa copy.

Contributors to digital file: Elizabeth Lorang, Brett Barney, Zach Bajaber, Kelly Tetterton, Ed Folsom, Kenneth M. Price, and Nicole Gray

Cite this page: Whitman, Walt. Leaves of Grass . 1855. The Walt Whitman Archive . Gen. ed. Ed Folsom and Kenneth M. Price. Accessed 1 February 2018. <http://www.whitmanarchive.org>.

I landed on the Discovery channel the other night and watched a rare look inside the MV Augusta factory, where they built the F4-312. 

At any rate, I’ve watched the ‘Twist The Throttle ‘ documentary series in the past, but MV Augusta was one story I had not viewed on the world’s most famous sport motorcycling brand.  The series reviews various brands (Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, Ducati, Bimota, BMW and Alpinestars) histories, what happens behind the scenes at their factories, inside their research and development centers and ultimately what it’s like to ride the machines on some of the great motorcycle roads and race tracks around the world.  The series is available on the  Discovery Turbo website .

For example I learned it takes 11 hours to build the F4 engine and 4.5 hours to build just one motorcycle.  It was also interesting to hear several of the on camera interviews evangelized the lack of any hard-core time-based manufacturing processes… huh?  Isn’t MV a motorcycle manufacture?  Watching the story you couldn’t help but think a bottle of red wine followed each motorcycle down the assembly line like a cocktail soiree and when it’s done, it’s done.  No rush…we’re artists!  Wow, the Italian build process seemed opposite and very casual compared to the Milwaukee plant tour I attended last year.

This isn’t really news, since the bike has been for sale for ages, bit since Russel Mitchell  reduced the price for this scoot down to $25K it seems time to talk about it.

Russel created this bike to showcase Exile Chopper”s lineup of parts to make  a standard Softail look like a custom build from a pro shop.  Featuring Exile’s trademark minimalist approach to building, this scoot features a laundry list of  custom features to dramtically change the look of the otherwise plain Jane Softail Standard, like Russell’s super-clean handlebar setup complete with a twist-clutch and hidden controls.

You’d pay a lot more for the bike and the parts separately, not counting the time and effort to bolt them on yourself. Consider this your last chance to own a genuine Exile Cycle dream bike without forking over $30K plus. Don’t this this one pass you by. Get the full specs and more shots of the sled at Exile Cycles .

Source: University of Iowa Libraries, Special Collections & University Archives, FOLIO PS3201 1855, copy 1. The original e-text for this file was prepared by Primary Source Media for Major Authors on CD-ROM: Walt Whitman (1997). The source text for the Primary Source Media edition was Walt Whitman, Complete Poetry and Collected Prose , ed. Justin Kaplan (New York: Literary Classics of the United States, 1982). After receiving the e-text from Primary Source Media, Whitman Archive staff checked and corrected the transcription against images of the University of Iowa copy.

Contributors to digital file: Elizabeth Lorang, Brett Barney, Zach Bajaber, Kelly Tetterton, Ed Folsom, Kenneth M. Price, and Nicole Gray

Cite this page: Whitman, Walt. Leaves of Grass . 1855. The Walt Whitman Archive . Gen. ed. Ed Folsom and Kenneth M. Price. Accessed 1 February 2018. <http://www.whitmanarchive.org>.

I landed on the Discovery channel the other night and watched a rare look inside the MV Augusta factory, where they built the F4-312. 

At any rate, I’ve watched the ‘Twist The Throttle ‘ documentary series in the past, but MV Augusta was one story I had not viewed on the world’s most famous sport motorcycling brand.  The series reviews various brands (Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, Ducati, Bimota, BMW and Alpinestars) histories, what happens behind the scenes at their factories, inside their research and development centers and ultimately what it’s like to ride the machines on some of the great motorcycle roads and race tracks around the world.  The series is available on the  Discovery Turbo website .

For example I learned it takes 11 hours to build the F4 engine and 4.5 hours to build just one motorcycle.  It was also interesting to hear several of the on camera interviews evangelized the lack of any hard-core time-based manufacturing processes… huh?  Isn’t MV a motorcycle manufacture?  Watching the story you couldn’t help but think a bottle of red wine followed each motorcycle down the assembly line like a cocktail soiree and when it’s done, it’s done.  No rush…we’re artists!  Wow, the Italian build process seemed opposite and very casual compared to the Milwaukee plant tour I attended last year.

This isn’t really news, since the bike has been for sale for ages, bit since Russel Mitchell  reduced the price for this scoot down to $25K it seems time to talk about it.

Russel created this bike to showcase Exile Chopper”s lineup of parts to make  a standard Softail look like a custom build from a pro shop.  Featuring Exile’s trademark minimalist approach to building, this scoot features a laundry list of  custom features to dramtically change the look of the otherwise plain Jane Softail Standard, like Russell’s super-clean handlebar setup complete with a twist-clutch and hidden controls.

You’d pay a lot more for the bike and the parts separately, not counting the time and effort to bolt them on yourself. Consider this your last chance to own a genuine Exile Cycle dream bike without forking over $30K plus. Don’t this this one pass you by. Get the full specs and more shots of the sled at Exile Cycles .

I landed on the Discovery channel the other night and watched a rare look inside the MV Augusta factory, where they built the F4-312. 

At any rate, I’ve watched the ‘Twist The Throttle ‘ documentary series in the past, but MV Augusta was one story I had not viewed on the world’s most famous sport motorcycling brand.  The series reviews various brands (Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, Ducati, Bimota, BMW and Alpinestars) histories, what happens behind the scenes at their factories, inside their research and development centers and ultimately what it’s like to ride the machines on some of the great motorcycle roads and race tracks around the world.  The series is available on the  Discovery Turbo website .

For example I learned it takes 11 hours to build the F4 engine and 4.5 hours to build just one motorcycle.  It was also interesting to hear several of the on camera interviews evangelized the lack of any hard-core time-based manufacturing processes… huh?  Isn’t MV a motorcycle manufacture?  Watching the story you couldn’t help but think a bottle of red wine followed each motorcycle down the assembly line like a cocktail soiree and when it’s done, it’s done.  No rush…we’re artists!  Wow, the Italian build process seemed opposite and very casual compared to the Milwaukee plant tour I attended last year.

Source: University of Iowa Libraries, Special Collections & University Archives, FOLIO PS3201 1855, copy 1. The original e-text for this file was prepared by Primary Source Media for Major Authors on CD-ROM: Walt Whitman (1997). The source text for the Primary Source Media edition was Walt Whitman, Complete Poetry and Collected Prose , ed. Justin Kaplan (New York: Literary Classics of the United States, 1982). After receiving the e-text from Primary Source Media, Whitman Archive staff checked and corrected the transcription against images of the University of Iowa copy.

Contributors to digital file: Elizabeth Lorang, Brett Barney, Zach Bajaber, Kelly Tetterton, Ed Folsom, Kenneth M. Price, and Nicole Gray

Cite this page: Whitman, Walt. Leaves of Grass . 1855. The Walt Whitman Archive . Gen. ed. Ed Folsom and Kenneth M. Price. Accessed 1 February 2018. <http://www.whitmanarchive.org>.

I landed on the Discovery channel the other night and watched a rare look inside the MV Augusta factory, where they built the F4-312. 

At any rate, I’ve watched the ‘Twist The Throttle ‘ documentary series in the past, but MV Augusta was one story I had not viewed on the world’s most famous sport motorcycling brand.  The series reviews various brands (Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, Ducati, Bimota, BMW and Alpinestars) histories, what happens behind the scenes at their factories, inside their research and development centers and ultimately what it’s like to ride the machines on some of the great motorcycle roads and race tracks around the world.  The series is available on the  Discovery Turbo website .

For example I learned it takes 11 hours to build the F4 engine and 4.5 hours to build just one motorcycle.  It was also interesting to hear several of the on camera interviews evangelized the lack of any hard-core time-based manufacturing processes… huh?  Isn’t MV a motorcycle manufacture?  Watching the story you couldn’t help but think a bottle of red wine followed each motorcycle down the assembly line like a cocktail soiree and when it’s done, it’s done.  No rush…we’re artists!  Wow, the Italian build process seemed opposite and very casual compared to the Milwaukee plant tour I attended last year.

Source: University of Iowa Libraries, Special Collections & University Archives, FOLIO PS3201 1855, copy 1. The original e-text for this file was prepared by Primary Source Media for Major Authors on CD-ROM: Walt Whitman (1997). The source text for the Primary Source Media edition was Walt Whitman, Complete Poetry and Collected Prose , ed. Justin Kaplan (New York: Literary Classics of the United States, 1982). After receiving the e-text from Primary Source Media, Whitman Archive staff checked and corrected the transcription against images of the University of Iowa copy.

Contributors to digital file: Elizabeth Lorang, Brett Barney, Zach Bajaber, Kelly Tetterton, Ed Folsom, Kenneth M. Price, and Nicole Gray

Cite this page: Whitman, Walt. Leaves of Grass . 1855. The Walt Whitman Archive . Gen. ed. Ed Folsom and Kenneth M. Price. Accessed 1 February 2018. <http://www.whitmanarchive.org>.

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