‘The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific.
The history of science is the study of the development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural and social sciences . (The history of the arts and humanities is termed history of scholarship .) Science is a body of

The history of science is the study of the development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural and social sciences . (The history of the arts and humanities is termed history of scholarship .) Science is a body of empirical , theoretical , and practical knowledge about the natural world , produced by scientists who emphasize the observation, explanation , and prediction of real world phenomena . Historiography of science , in contrast, studies the methods employed by historians of science.

From the 18th century through late 20th century, the history of science, especially of the physical and biological sciences, was often presented in a progressive narrative in which true theories replaced false beliefs. [4] Some more recent historical interpretations, such as those of Thomas Kuhn , tend to portray the history of science in terms of competing paradigms or conceptual systems in a wider matrix of intellectual, cultural, economic and political trends. [5]

In prehistoric times, technique and knowledge were passed from generation to generation in an oral tradition . For example, the domestication of maize for agriculture has been dated to about 9,000 years ago in southern Mexico, before the development of writing systems . [6] [7] [8] Similarly, archaeological evidence indicates the development of astronomical knowledge in preliterate societies. [9] [10] The development of writing enabled knowledge to be stored and communicated across generations with much greater fidelity.

I n a period roughly encompassing the second half of the 18th century and the first half of the 19th, a handful of very young European men crisscrossed the world on ships and changed the way we think. The insights that these slightly annoying but wonderful individuals gained on their journeys have surely had a far more profound impact on how we see the world than, say, the French Revolution.

Andrea Wulf’s enjoyable new book tackles Alexander von Humboldt, the Prussian polymath, author and explorer. He transformed our understanding of physical geography and meteorology, and spent his life trying to bind together the workings of the Earth and ultimately the cosmos (a term he coined in its modern sense in Kosmos , his five-volume treatise on the unity of science, published between 1845 and 1862) through universal rules.

Many of the other young naturalists tended, boa constrictor-like, to gorge themselves on specimens from a single trip and then spend years digesting them, never setting foot outside their homes again except to collect awards. One of the many pleasures of Humboldt is that he never mutated into a hide-bound panjandrum. He started his exploring career later than the others, setting foot in South America for the first time in the summer of 1799, shortly before his 30th birthday. On his return in 1804 he planned all manner of thwarted expeditions before finally hurtling across the length of Russia aged 59, “the crazy Prussian prince Humblot”, as one of his Cossack guards called him.

The history of science is the study of the development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural and social sciences . (The history of the arts and humanities is termed history of scholarship .) Science is a body of empirical , theoretical , and practical knowledge about the natural world , produced by scientists who emphasize the observation, explanation , and prediction of real world phenomena . Historiography of science , in contrast, studies the methods employed by historians of science.

From the 18th century through late 20th century, the history of science, especially of the physical and biological sciences, was often presented in a progressive narrative in which true theories replaced false beliefs. [4] Some more recent historical interpretations, such as those of Thomas Kuhn , tend to portray the history of science in terms of competing paradigms or conceptual systems in a wider matrix of intellectual, cultural, economic and political trends. [5]

In prehistoric times, technique and knowledge were passed from generation to generation in an oral tradition . For example, the domestication of maize for agriculture has been dated to about 9,000 years ago in southern Mexico, before the development of writing systems . [6] [7] [8] Similarly, archaeological evidence indicates the development of astronomical knowledge in preliterate societies. [9] [10] The development of writing enabled knowledge to be stored and communicated across generations with much greater fidelity.

The history of science is the study of the development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural and social sciences . (The history of the arts and humanities is termed history of scholarship .) Science is a body of empirical , theoretical , and practical knowledge about the natural world , produced by scientists who emphasize the observation, explanation , and prediction of real world phenomena . Historiography of science , in contrast, studies the methods employed by historians of science.

From the 18th century through late 20th century, the history of science, especially of the physical and biological sciences, was often presented in a progressive narrative in which true theories replaced false beliefs. [4] Some more recent historical interpretations, such as those of Thomas Kuhn , tend to portray the history of science in terms of competing paradigms or conceptual systems in a wider matrix of intellectual, cultural, economic and political trends. [5]

In prehistoric times, technique and knowledge were passed from generation to generation in an oral tradition . For example, the domestication of maize for agriculture has been dated to about 9,000 years ago in southern Mexico, before the development of writing systems . [6] [7] [8] Similarly, archaeological evidence indicates the development of astronomical knowledge in preliterate societies. [9] [10] The development of writing enabled knowledge to be stored and communicated across generations with much greater fidelity.

I n a period roughly encompassing the second half of the 18th century and the first half of the 19th, a handful of very young European men crisscrossed the world on ships and changed the way we think. The insights that these slightly annoying but wonderful individuals gained on their journeys have surely had a far more profound impact on how we see the world than, say, the French Revolution.

Andrea Wulf’s enjoyable new book tackles Alexander von Humboldt, the Prussian polymath, author and explorer. He transformed our understanding of physical geography and meteorology, and spent his life trying to bind together the workings of the Earth and ultimately the cosmos (a term he coined in its modern sense in Kosmos , his five-volume treatise on the unity of science, published between 1845 and 1862) through universal rules.

Many of the other young naturalists tended, boa constrictor-like, to gorge themselves on specimens from a single trip and then spend years digesting them, never setting foot outside their homes again except to collect awards. One of the many pleasures of Humboldt is that he never mutated into a hide-bound panjandrum. He started his exploring career later than the others, setting foot in South America for the first time in the summer of 1799, shortly before his 30th birthday. On his return in 1804 he planned all manner of thwarted expeditions before finally hurtling across the length of Russia aged 59, “the crazy Prussian prince Humblot”, as one of his Cossack guards called him.

Published in USA  Dec 2015
784 pages
Genre: History, Science & Current Affairs

Publication Information

A companion to such acclaimed works as The Age of Wonder, A Clockwork Universe, and Darwin's Ghosts —a groundbreaking examination of the greatest event in history, the Scientific Revolution, and how it came to change the way we understand ourselves and our world.

Relentlessly compelling psychological suspense. The must-read thriller debut of 2018.
Reader Reviews

We live in a world made by science. How and when did this happen? This book tells the story of the extraordinary intellectual and cultural revolution that gave birth to modern science, and mounts a major challenge to the prevailing orthodoxy of its history.

Before 1492 it was assumed that all significant knowledge was already available; there was no concept of progress; people looked for understanding to the past not the future. This book argues that the discovery of America demonstrated that new knowledge was possible: indeed it introduced the very concept of 'discovery', and opened the way to the invention of science.

The first crucial discovery was Tycho Brahe's nova of 1572: proof that there could be change in the heavens. The telescope (1610) rendered the old astronomy obsolete. Torricelli's experiment with the vacuum (1643) led directly to the triumph of the experimental method in the Royal Society of Boyle and Newton. By 1750 Newtonianism was being celebrated throughout Europe.

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The history of science is the study of the development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural and social sciences . (The history of the arts and humanities is termed history of scholarship .) Science is a body of empirical , theoretical , and practical knowledge about the natural world , produced by scientists who emphasize the observation, explanation , and prediction of real world phenomena . Historiography of science , in contrast, studies the methods employed by historians of science.

From the 18th century through late 20th century, the history of science, especially of the physical and biological sciences, was often presented in a progressive narrative in which true theories replaced false beliefs. [4] Some more recent historical interpretations, such as those of Thomas Kuhn , tend to portray the history of science in terms of competing paradigms or conceptual systems in a wider matrix of intellectual, cultural, economic and political trends. [5]

In prehistoric times, technique and knowledge were passed from generation to generation in an oral tradition . For example, the domestication of maize for agriculture has been dated to about 9,000 years ago in southern Mexico, before the development of writing systems . [6] [7] [8] Similarly, archaeological evidence indicates the development of astronomical knowledge in preliterate societies. [9] [10] The development of writing enabled knowledge to be stored and communicated across generations with much greater fidelity.

I n a period roughly encompassing the second half of the 18th century and the first half of the 19th, a handful of very young European men crisscrossed the world on ships and changed the way we think. The insights that these slightly annoying but wonderful individuals gained on their journeys have surely had a far more profound impact on how we see the world than, say, the French Revolution.

Andrea Wulf’s enjoyable new book tackles Alexander von Humboldt, the Prussian polymath, author and explorer. He transformed our understanding of physical geography and meteorology, and spent his life trying to bind together the workings of the Earth and ultimately the cosmos (a term he coined in its modern sense in Kosmos , his five-volume treatise on the unity of science, published between 1845 and 1862) through universal rules.

Many of the other young naturalists tended, boa constrictor-like, to gorge themselves on specimens from a single trip and then spend years digesting them, never setting foot outside their homes again except to collect awards. One of the many pleasures of Humboldt is that he never mutated into a hide-bound panjandrum. He started his exploring career later than the others, setting foot in South America for the first time in the summer of 1799, shortly before his 30th birthday. On his return in 1804 he planned all manner of thwarted expeditions before finally hurtling across the length of Russia aged 59, “the crazy Prussian prince Humblot”, as one of his Cossack guards called him.

Published in USA  Dec 2015
784 pages
Genre: History, Science & Current Affairs

Publication Information

A companion to such acclaimed works as The Age of Wonder, A Clockwork Universe, and Darwin's Ghosts —a groundbreaking examination of the greatest event in history, the Scientific Revolution, and how it came to change the way we understand ourselves and our world.

Relentlessly compelling psychological suspense. The must-read thriller debut of 2018.
Reader Reviews

The history of science is the study of the development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural and social sciences . (The history of the arts and humanities is termed history of scholarship .) Science is a body of empirical , theoretical , and practical knowledge about the natural world , produced by scientists who emphasize the observation, explanation , and prediction of real world phenomena . Historiography of science , in contrast, studies the methods employed by historians of science.

From the 18th century through late 20th century, the history of science, especially of the physical and biological sciences, was often presented in a progressive narrative in which true theories replaced false beliefs. [4] Some more recent historical interpretations, such as those of Thomas Kuhn , tend to portray the history of science in terms of competing paradigms or conceptual systems in a wider matrix of intellectual, cultural, economic and political trends. [5]

In prehistoric times, technique and knowledge were passed from generation to generation in an oral tradition . For example, the domestication of maize for agriculture has been dated to about 9,000 years ago in southern Mexico, before the development of writing systems . [6] [7] [8] Similarly, archaeological evidence indicates the development of astronomical knowledge in preliterate societies. [9] [10] The development of writing enabled knowledge to be stored and communicated across generations with much greater fidelity.

I n a period roughly encompassing the second half of the 18th century and the first half of the 19th, a handful of very young European men crisscrossed the world on ships and changed the way we think. The insights that these slightly annoying but wonderful individuals gained on their journeys have surely had a far more profound impact on how we see the world than, say, the French Revolution.

Andrea Wulf’s enjoyable new book tackles Alexander von Humboldt, the Prussian polymath, author and explorer. He transformed our understanding of physical geography and meteorology, and spent his life trying to bind together the workings of the Earth and ultimately the cosmos (a term he coined in its modern sense in Kosmos , his five-volume treatise on the unity of science, published between 1845 and 1862) through universal rules.

Many of the other young naturalists tended, boa constrictor-like, to gorge themselves on specimens from a single trip and then spend years digesting them, never setting foot outside their homes again except to collect awards. One of the many pleasures of Humboldt is that he never mutated into a hide-bound panjandrum. He started his exploring career later than the others, setting foot in South America for the first time in the summer of 1799, shortly before his 30th birthday. On his return in 1804 he planned all manner of thwarted expeditions before finally hurtling across the length of Russia aged 59, “the crazy Prussian prince Humblot”, as one of his Cossack guards called him.

Published in USA  Dec 2015
784 pages
Genre: History, Science & Current Affairs

Publication Information

A companion to such acclaimed works as The Age of Wonder, A Clockwork Universe, and Darwin's Ghosts —a groundbreaking examination of the greatest event in history, the Scientific Revolution, and how it came to change the way we understand ourselves and our world.

Relentlessly compelling psychological suspense. The must-read thriller debut of 2018.
Reader Reviews

We live in a world made by science. How and when did this happen? This book tells the story of the extraordinary intellectual and cultural revolution that gave birth to modern science, and mounts a major challenge to the prevailing orthodoxy of its history.

Before 1492 it was assumed that all significant knowledge was already available; there was no concept of progress; people looked for understanding to the past not the future. This book argues that the discovery of America demonstrated that new knowledge was possible: indeed it introduced the very concept of 'discovery', and opened the way to the invention of science.

The first crucial discovery was Tycho Brahe's nova of 1572: proof that there could be change in the heavens. The telescope (1610) rendered the old astronomy obsolete. Torricelli's experiment with the vacuum (1643) led directly to the triumph of the experimental method in the Royal Society of Boyle and Newton. By 1750 Newtonianism was being celebrated throughout Europe.

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